Tagged: Pete Kozma

Springfield Rolls; St. Louis Rocks a Trade

While the
St. Louis Cardinals and the Memphis Redbirds have their struggles, the
Springfield Cardinals are rolling.  On
Friday, they clinched a playoff appearance with a 10-2 win over the Tulsa
Drillers. On Saturday, I traveled to
Tulsa to check out this hot Springfield team

 

 

“Well,
there’s something you don’t see every day” -Dr. Peter Venkman (Ghostbusters)

 

 

As I
approached the park, I saw something strange in the neighborhood:

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I’m still
not sure what the Ghostbusters car was all about.  It drove around the field playing the
Ghostbusters theme song.  It stopped
behind homeplate and guys got out armed with proton packs.  I was really hoping for a Stay Puft
Marshmallow Man sighting.  But, there
were no ghosts to bust and no one got slimed. 

 IMG_4343.JPG

 

On a Roll…

 

The
Springfield Cardinals picked up where they left off the night before, although
the Tulsa Drillers were given hope when their starter Keith Weiser struck out
Cardinals lead-off hitter, Antonio DeJesus.

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Shortstop,
Peter Kozma, came to the plate.  Kozma’s
hometown is a few miles north of
Tulsa, so the local boy always gets a
few cheers.  Kozma singled.

 

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The
Drillers were worried about Kozma, a base-stealing threat.

 

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As well they
should be.  Kozma swiped second.

 IMG_4353.JPG

 

Kozma’s
fellow infielder, second baseman Daniel Descalso, who is hitting .329 and
slugging .532, knocked a double to score Kozma. 
He did it so quickly that I did not get a picture until he was on second
base.

 IMG_4361.JPG

 

Steven
Hill, who is listed as a catcher but was playing left field, flew out to right.  Tony Cruz, who is listed as a catcher and was
playing catcher, reached on a error. 
Descalso scored from second as the Drillers first baseman chased down
the missed catch.

 IMG_4365.JPG

 

 

A fan
behind me made the comment that “an error is like a can opener”.  It is probably a common expression, but I had
never heard it.  In this case, it turned
out to be true.

 

 

Centerfielder,
James Rapoport, singled quickly (i.e. no pic). 
That brought to the plate, big first baseman, Matt Arburr.  How big you ask?  6′ 4″, 260 pounds.  Mike Hamilton was called up to
AAA Memphis, so Arburr is getting his
chance.  He did not miss this one:  2 RBI Double. 
In the seventh, he would also have a solo home run.

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Third
baseman, Mike Folli, ended the inning with a fly-out to right.

 

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But, the
damage was done.  Cardinals lead
4-0.  They had another four run inning in
the third, but Kozma’s first run would be all the Cardinals would need, as
starting pitcher, Ryan Kulik, pitched a beaut. 
Eight shut-out innings, five hits, one K, no walks.  Twelve groundouts.  Eleven flyouts.

 

 IMG_4401.JPG

 

 

 

Tyler
Norrick came in to pitch the ninth.  The
Missouri native was un-hittable, but not
necessarily in a good way.  He walked the
bases loaded
AND struck out the side.

 IMG_4412.JPG

 

Cardinals
win 9-0.


 

In most
minor league parks, you will find a between innings food race.  You might think if you have seen one, you
have seen them all.  I must give a tip of
the hat to the folks at
Drillers Park that flirt with heatstroke to
dress up as QuickTrip food items. 

 

Hot dog,
Taquito and Egg Roll are very creative in mixing up the race and coming up with
gimmicks to make it interesting.  In the
latest installment, Egg Roll came from behind with a snow shovel, knocked Hot
Dog down with a sharp blow to the back. 
As Taquito attended to his fallen food item friend, Egg Roll crossed the
finish line.

 

 IMG_4408.JPG

 

 

 

Everything is Coming up
De-Rosas

 

Yep, that
pun was a stretch.  As I drove home from
Tulsa, I tuned into MLB Homeplate on XM Radio.  When they said they had a breaking story on a
Cardinals trade, I held my breath. 
Trades make me very nervous. 
Perhaps, I get too attached to Cardinal players.  I usually hate to see them go. 

 

Then, all
the trade rumors had been about a rental deal for Matt Holliday.  In all the scenarios I heard, the price
seemed too high.  I did not make sense to
me to trade the second best power threat (Ludwick), plus a pitcher, plus a
prospect just to have Holliday for a few months.

 

So, with
breath held, I listened to the news: 
Mark Derosa for Chris Perez and a “player to be named later”.  I exhaled in relief.  I can live with that.  In fact, I am excited about it.

 

My mind
went into high gear, considering all the defensive alignment options.  That was followed by all the offensive
line-up options.  The possibilities are
endless. 

 

Mark
DeRosa is such a good fit.  I have
secretly always liked this player, even when he was a cub.  Not that I liked playing against him, but
next to catching, utility players are my favorite.  DeRosa can play anywhere, and by all accounts
he is a class act, a great guy to have in your clubhouse.

 

 

And,
doesn’t it feel like we stole him from the cubs?  That may be the thing that puts a rather evil
smile on the face of Cardinal Nation. 
The cubs traded him to the
AL, so DeRosa could not hurt them.  They signed our utility player, Aaron Miles, out
from under our nose.  Ironically, Miles has
not played nearly as well as a cub.  That
made payroll room for the cubs to sign Milton Bradley, who has been nothing but
a blight.  Now, DeRosa is back in the NL
Central, in the clubhouse of a division rival and posed to do damage to his
former team.  Score a coup for the
Cardinals.

 

All that
said, I will miss the flame-throwing, Chris Perez.  And, he may come back to haunt us, as traded
players often do.  I wish Perez all the
best.  I hope he has a great career, and
stays in the American League.  Here is
Perez warming up in
San Francisco:

 

 IMG_3091.JPG

 

 

And,
there is a list of potential “players to be named later”.  I do not know who is on this list, and that
makes me nervous.  But, for today, I look
forward to seeing DeRosa wearing the ‘Birds on the Bat’.  He is the type of player that was born for
it.

A Week in My Baseball Loving Life

The pursuit of happiness (watching baseball games) has left me little time to write.  So, finally, here is summary of the past week in my baseball loving life.

 

 

Friday, May 1st – Cold Night, Cold Bats

 

I left work at 5:00 in a rush to get Tulsa.  A 2+ hour drive.  A 7:05 start.  The AA Springfield Cardinals against the Tulsa Drillers. 

 

Fortunately, the St. Louis Cardinals were playing the Washington Nationals on the east coast with a 6:05 central start time.  So, for the second half the drive, I had Mike Shannon and John Rooney to keep me company.  Before I reached Drillers Stadium, Wellemeyer was off to a good start and both Albert Pujols and Chris Duncan had homered.

 

If Major League ballparks are cathedrals and Triple-A parks are lovely chapels, then the Drillers Stadium is little more than a place to hold a camp meeting.  The park serves the purpose but is lacking in charm and beauty.  However, the Tulsa Drillers are playing their last season in Drillers Stadium.  A new park is under construction closer to downtown.   

 

But, I know the folks that live close to Drillers will miss them next year.  A friend of mine grew up in the neighborhood and could watch the Friday night fireworks from her backyard.

 

The Drillers threw a gem.  The Cardinals bats did not get going.  The biggest cheer for the Cardinals came when shortstop, Peter Kozma, came to the plate.  Peter Kozma is from Owasso, Oklahoma, which is a few miles north of Tulsa.  This was his first game with the AA Cardinals, as he benefited from the trickle down effect of the Tyler Greene call up to St. Louis.

 

 

 


PeteKozma.JPGSitting near third base, I got a good look at last year’s number one draft pick, Brett Wallace.  He went 0-for on the night, but then again most of the Cardinals combined for only six hits against the good Driller pitching.  Wallace did make some solid plays at third.

 

 


BrettWallace.JPGHere Wallace is playing in, defending the bunt:

 


BuntDefense.JPG 

I thought back to last year when I impressed by another third baseman.  That player came into spring training hitting like crazy, over .500.  He is doing well at Triple-A Memphis this year.  I wonder where they will both be next year.

 

One prospect that did get a hit is outfielder Daryl Jones:

 

 


DarylJones.JPGAnd, no minor league game is complete without a food race.  In this case it is the burrito, hotdog and eggroll from QuickTrip.  Burrito wins!  But, the Cardinals lose 5-3

 

 


FoodRaceJPG 

It was not a nice night for baseball.  Chilly and damp.  Although it never actually rained, a mist hung in the air the whole game.  I began to think I would never be warm again.  By the end of the game, I figure the only people left in the stands were me, another Cardinals fan, the players’ families and two drunk hecklers.

 

I have been single much of my adult life.  I am cool with that.  Probably, too much so.  I am comfortable going most places by myself.  Never is that more true than at the ballpark.  I have a seat that is mine, so I have a place to be.  The people around me also like baseball, so I belong.  And, it seems like no matter where you go, there is always a Cardinals fan to chat with.

 

Sitting in front of me at the Drillers game was Scott, the aforementioned other Cardinal fan who stuck out the game.  We talked throughout the game, sharing Cardinal experiences and thoughts on players.  He was a Cardinals fan by birth, the great-nephew of Oklahoman and Cardinal, Pepper Martin. 

 

 

Saturday, May 2nd – Just Call Me Ball

 

Today was a family day.  A Kentucky Derby themed 21st birthday party.  Fun times with family in friends.  However, all the fun was happening in Kansas City.  So, I spent the night in Tulsa and was on the road again by 7:00 am.

 

Four hours later, I stopped to visit the youngest of our family, my nephew, who is 20 months old.  Before going in the house, I reached into my baseball game bag and dug out a baseball from an OKC AAA game, which I slipped into my pocket.

 


Nephew.JPG 

After greeting the family, I asked my nephew, “What does Auntie have in her pocket?”  He walks over, digs out the ball, gives me a million dollar smile and says, “Ball!”.  Then, in a memory I will treasure forever, we had our first catch.

 

Well, maybe, it was not actually “catch”.  Basically, he fired the ball as hard as he could at me from two to three feet away, while I pulled out my best Molina catching skills.  The kid has an arm, but he does not exactly have pinpoint control, yet.  Check out his form.  Up over his front leg, nice follow through.  Wonder how much Dave Duncan charges to tutor toddlers?

 

 

For the rest of the weekend, he scoured my pockets for balls and anytime someone said, “Where’s Auntie?”  He would point at me and said “Ball?”  I have been called much worse.  He also had a catch with his dad where I captured this shot:

 

 


DadSonBall.JPG 

While we were playing catch, the Cardinals-Nationals game got underway.  I reached my car in the 5th inning to drive to my sisters.  The score was 0-0.  Somewhere along the short drive from the suburbs to the plaza, the score was suddenly 4-0, Nationals.  A single, a force out bunt, another single, a sac fly, a potentially inning ending dropped foul popup, another single (Ryan Zimmerman, a name I am suddenly all too familiar with), all topped off with a big home run from their big guy, Adam Dunn. Brutal.

 

With the Royals’ hot start, the city is buzzing about them.  Later at the birthday party at a local pub, the Royals game was on.  People were actually watching.  I lived through many baseball drought years in this city.  It nice to see the citizens of Kansas City falling back in love with their team.

 

 

Sunday, May 3rd – A Wash Out from Top to Bottom

 

Time to come home.  The plan was to listen to the Cardinals-Nationals game on the road, and to drop back by the Driller Stadium to catch another Springfield Cardinals game.  Mother Nature had other plans.  Both games rained out.  Coincidently, the Memphis Redbirds rained out, too.

 

I had to console myself by listening to the San Francisco Giants game. Good to have a backup team. But, it was not the same.  Bengie Molina had the day off.  The Giants finally beat the Colorado Rockies in the 10th by finally scoring the only run of the game on Rich Aurilla’s walk-off RBI single.

 

Monday, May 4th – Play a Hard Nine

 

The World Champion, Philadelphia Phillies, rolled into St. Louis for a two-game series with big bat and hometown hero, Ryan Howard, in tow.  Howard always plays well in St. Louis.  However, hitting a grand slam in the 5th seemed a bit like over-kill.

 

Cardinals pitcher, Kyle Lohse’s non-throwing arm was drilled by a pitch while batting.  While he refused to use that as an excuse, the fact is he was pitching well before taking the bullet.  He was not sharp afterwards.

 

“Play a hard nine” is the Cardinals mantra.  They all talk about it.  They all do it.  It is the Cardinals way.  For the past couple years, the Cardinals marketing theme has been “Play like a Cardinal”.  It might as well be “Play a Hard Nine” because it means the same thing.

 

As Cardinal fans we sometimes have cause to whine about a lack of execution, but we rarely, if ever, have reason to complain about players not giving 100%.  For example, in today’s game, Joe Thurston ran through third base coach Jose Oquendo’s stop sign and right into an inning ending out.  Again. 

 

While we applaud Thurston’s gumption, we hope he is beginning to understand that Jose Oquendo is one the most aggressive Cardinals to ever play or coach the game.  Nothing good can come of trying to be more aggressive than him.

 

 

 
 

Thumbnail image for AnkielinMemphis.JPG One player that always plays a hard nine is Rick Ankiel.  How many outstanding diving, running or leaping catches has he already made this year with no thought to his own safety?  Tonight, he almost made one too many. 

 

Chasing a line drive, running all out and making the catch, Rick Ankiel ran out of room, stumbled, and had no time to put on the brakes before crashing headfirst into the outfield wall.  Flipped over by the force, he landed on his back.  Arms above his head, the ball rolled out of his left hand.  Even knowing the collision was imminent, he had transferred the ball from the glove, looking to make a throw, even though no runners were on.

 

 

If there was any air left in Busch Stadium after Ryan Howard’s Grand Slam, it was sucked out as Rick Ankiel lay motionless on the warning track.  The TV cameras scanned the worried faces of the crowd.  Not so much worried about losing Ankiel to the DL for a while, but worried that he could be lost forever.  As he left the field on a cart, strapped to a back board, he gave the thumbs up he knew his friends, family and fans needed to see.  Later, we would get the reports that although banged up, he will be fine.

 

He did this in the 8th inning of a 6-1 game that the Cardinals had all but lost.  When asked about it later, he said basically even if the play is not going to change the game, the pitchers still have ERAs to protect.  On a team where “pitch to contact” is preached, never has “I’ve got your back” meant more.

 

Often it seems the pitcher stands all by himself on the mound.  Solitary.  Alone.  His only friend, perhaps the catcher 60 feet 6 inches away.  Not so, the Cardinals pitchers.  They can feel the safety net behind them.  A safety net ready, willing and able to go the distance for as many innings as it takes.  All they have to do is keep it in the park.

 

However, the Cardinals defense has been criticized for the league leading error total racked up thus far this year.  What statistics do not easily show is that for every error, there has been a play that should not have been made, but was.  Rick Ankiel’s catch is just another one of those impossible plays.

 

Tuesday, May 5TH – Home Run Derby

 

I was missing my Oklahoma City Redhawks and hoping to go see them.  However, it rained all day long, and the evening forecast did not look inviting.  So, I stayed home and watched the Home Run Derby.

 

And, by Home Run Derby, I mean the Cardinals-Phillies game.  Five long balls left Busch Stadium.  The Phillies hit two off Adam Wainwright.  Shane Victorino took a solo shot in the first.  Jason Werth hit a three-run jack in the fifth.

 

Ryan Ludwick and Yadier Molina both took solo shots off Brett Myers.  Molina’s career high season home run total is eight.  This was his third, which in theory would put him on pace for 18. In other news, Albert Pujols took Brad Lidge deep.  Again.

 

The Cardinals chipped away, scoring runs in five consecutive innings, but it was not enough.  Phillies win 10-7.

 

Wednesday, May 6th – Oh, What a Relief

 

After dropping two games to the Phillies, the other Pennsylvania team came to town:  The Pittsburgh Pirates.   Albert Pujols homered at his last at bat on Tuesday.  He homered at his first at bat on Wednesday.  He also went 4-4.  It is hard to beat the Cardinals when #5 is hot in the three hole.

 

Chris Duncan was also an offensive force with a two-run triple.  Khalil Greene was back in the lineup after being limited to a pinch hitting role by a sore forearm.  He got a double and a RBI on a sac fly. 

 

Rookie Mitchell Boggs got the start.  He gave up five hits and five walks.  With that many ducks on the pond (runners on the bases), it is amazing he only allowed two runs.  He also had four strikeouts.  All this in 4.1 innings of work.  In the fifth, after walking the leadoff batter, who stole second and scored on a McLouth double, LaRussa took the ball from Boggs hands and handed it to the bullpen.

 

Trevor Miller, Kyle McClellan, Dennys Reyes, Jason Motte and Ryan Franklin were nearly spotless in relief.  Between them, only two walks, one hit, two strikeouts and no runs.  They protected the 2 run game.  McClellan go the win.  Franklin got the save.  His 8th out of eight opportunities,  but who’s counting.  Cardinals win 4-2.

 

 

Thursday, May 7th – Finally, Back to the Ballpark

 

The Cardinals played a matinee against the Pirates.  While I sat at work, a friend was at the game.  He texted me a picture of the arch from Busch Stadium. 

 

Color me green with envy.

 

However, the day was not a total loss.  I left work at 3:00 to head to the Oklahoma City Redhawks game and caught the end of the Cardinals game on the radio.  Yes, Schumaker had already hit his lead off triple and scored on an Albert Pujols sac fly.

 

The Cardinals had already put up a nice fat crooked “four” in the 5th inning.  Jason LaRue’s lead off homer got the party started.  Schumaker singles.  Rasmus bunt singled.  Pujols took a first pitch, 93 mph fast ball in the ribs to load the bases.  Ludwick was hit with same and a run scored.  Duncan sac flied.  Khalil Greene singled, and the Pirates were in a pit they would not recover from.  Cardinals win 5-2

 

Cardinal batters have been plunked seven times in four games.  Intentional or no?  Impossible to say.  But, the scouting report on the Cardinals seems to read “throw inside.”

 

Todd Wellemeyer, who has struggled a bit this spring, was super sharp, going seven innings, giving up two runs and notching the win.  Maybe May is his month.  Last year, Wellemeyer was the National League Pitcher of the Month in May.

 

Rick Ankiel was officially placed on the disabled list, and as I expected, outfielder Shane Robinson got the call from Memphis.  The slight-framed Robinson is a plus defender with plus speed.  He hits singles, turns them into doubles, draws walks, steals bases and will climb the outfield wall to make a catch. 

 

 


ShaneRobinson.JPG 

He only had a failed pinch hit opportunity today, but LaRussa has said he will get some starts soon.  I hate seeing players go down, but I love seeing them come up.

 

“Taste of the Big Leagues” is the theme at AT&T Bricktown Ballpark, home of the Oklahoma City Redhawks.  They opened with the Yankees. You can check out coverage of that here.

 

They continued with the Cubs and Wrigley field.  So, I was not sure I was going to enjoy this promotion very much. 

 

I was greeted with a poster of Mr. Cub, Ernie Banks, and his quote, “It’s a beautiful day for a ball game…let’s play two.”

 

 


Ernie Banks.JPG 

It was a nice day.  Finally, warm.  Can’t argue with that logic.

 

The Wrigley sign was cool:

 

 


WrigleySign.JPG 

The replica ivy wall was a nice touch.  I like ivy.  I think the ivy wall at Wrigley is beautiful.  Yet, I can not help but think about Rick Ankiel running into the padded wall at Busch.  Would the outcome have been far more serious had the wall been brick covered with a bit of ivy?

 

 


ivy.JPG 

The best piece of Wrigly to make its way to Oklahoma City had to be the historic scoreboard.  I took a full shot of it:

 

 


Wrigleyscoreboard.JPG 

Then I zoomed in on the only score on the board and was surprised (and delighted) to find the Cardinals winning.  What a strange homage to the Cubs?

 


scoreboardCardswin.JPG 

Finally, I purchased a Chicago Dog at the concession stand.  Chicago may be terrible in the post-season, but they know how to make a championship hot dog.  Good hot dog on a poppy seed bun topped with peppers, bright green relish, diced tomatoes, onions and mustard.  Yum-tastic.

 

Back to the game, the lead singer from Korn threw out the first pitch:

 

 


Korn.JPGBut, the pitcher to talke about was Eric Milton of the Albuquerque Isotopes:

 

 


MiltonDodger.JPG 

Milton had a perfect game going for five innings before giving up an infield single.  The Redhawks were shut out 7-0.

 

It is amazing how the quickly the wheels turn.  The night before Xavier Paul was playing for the Isotopes in Oklahoma City.  Midday, the news broke of Manny Ramirez’s 50 game suspension for a positive drug test.  By the time the rosters were printed in Oklahoma City, Xavier Paul’s was gone to Los Angeles, his name already removed from the AAA roster.

 

I listened to the Dodgers-Nationals game on the way home.  Here in the Midwest, west coast ballgames come in handy.  Dodgers were leading 6-0 when I tuned in.  The Dodgers were off to a great start putting up a six in the first.  Very reflective of their season so far, maybe too much so.

 

This season the Dodgers were setting records for their home winning streak, when suddenly their big bat is taken away for 50 games.  In Thursday’s game, the Dodgers were cruising.  In the six and seventh, the Nationals chipped away at the lead.  In the eighth, the Nats came to bat and stayed putting up six runs and giving former Cardinal, Ron Villone, a win in his first appearance with the Nationals.   The game seemed to be a synopsis of the Dodger season thus far. 

 

While the Nationals try to hit their way of the bottom (Hello, Ryan Zimmerman), the Dodgers are going to find it hard to stay on top with the loss of Manny’s bat.

 

Friday, May 9th – Memorable Bombs

 

The St. Louis Cardinals headed to Cincinnati to face the Reds.  Or, Cincyapolis, as the voice of the Cardinals, Mike Shannon called it the day before.  Joel Pineiro who has pitched like a new man this year, gave us glimpses of last year.  Pineiro struggled in the first two innings, giving up five runs and digging a hole that the Cardinals could not dig out of. 

 

Probably, his biggest mistake was not a pitch, but overthrowing to first on a bunt by opposing pitcher Cueto.  Three runs scored in the at bats that followed.  Pujols put a stopper in the inning by catching a Jay Bruce liner and stepping on first to double off Hairston

 

In Pineiro’s defense, many balls, not well-hit, dropped in for base hits.  Sometimes, that just happens.  Also to his credit, innings three through six were flawless.  Perez came in throwing a little wild and gave up the sixth run.

 

The Cardinal bats never really got going against the Reds’ Cueto, until the seventh when the eked out one run.  In the eighth, they took advantage of Weathers, starting with rookie Tyler Greene.

 

McRae told him to look for a first pitch fast ball.  Tyler Greene found one and smoked it to the bullpen in leftfield.  His first Major League home run.  The smile on his face could not have been bigger. 

 

The Cardinals rallied behind him.  Ludwick walked and stole second.  Duncan brought him in with a double and later scored on a Molina single.  But, that would be all the Cardinals would get.  Oddly enough, Albert Pujols was 0-4 on the night.  I would hate to be the next pitcher to face him.  Good luck, Haraung. 

 

I have been uncharacteristically quiet on all things regarding Alex Rodriguez.  Mostly because the accusations keep on coming and I have know way of really knowing what’s true or not, and really there is a part of me that does not care.  Maybe, if he were a Cardinal.  Maybe, if I had watched him play regularly, I could work up the proper outrage or disillusionment.  But, I got nothing.

 

However, I could not miss the announcement that he was returning to the Yankees lineup.  With the rough start the Yankees have had this year, they could seriously use a lift.  I hear Yankees fans say things like, “A-Rod is not really a Yankee”.  I thought to myself, if Alex Rodriguez comes back, plays well and the Yankees start winning, all will be forgiven. 

 

Inexplicably, I tuned in the Yankees game to see Alex Rodriguez’s first at bat.  I do not know why, maybe I was expecting to see something special.  I was rewarded.   He came to the plate with the table nicely set with two runners on and promptly jacks the ball out of the park.  Yankees beat the Orioles 4-0.

 

I am not condoning or condemning him for anything.  It is just nice to be talking about a baseball player in terms of actual baseball.

 

Next Week?

 

Bedlam baseball comes to Oklahoma City this weekend when OU and OSU take over the Redhawks park in Bricktown.  As a Cardinals fan, I normally where a lot of red, but as an OSU alum, I will be sporting my orange for the next two days.

 

The Redhawks will be home most of next week, so I will have opportunities there.  The Cardinals continue division play with the Reds, Pirates and Brewers. 

 

So much baseball, so little time!